Noise-induced Hearing Loss Health and Safety Resources

Work-related noise-induced hearing loss is an  occupational disease covered under the Workplace Safety and Insurance Act (WSIA).

As part of Ontario’s Integrated Health and Safety Strategy, the Ministry of Labour, Health and Safety Associations and the WSIB have specific roles and responsibilities when addressing noise-induced hearing loss and/or noise hazards in the workplace.

 

The WSIB’s role and responsibilities

We provide benefits and services to people with work-related noise-induced hearing loss.

If you are an employee, you should contact us if:

  • You believe your hearing loss is the result of working in one or more noisy environments in Ontario and your workplace falls under Ontario provincial jurisdiction in the WSIA, which includes most employers in Ontario.
  • You have been diagnosed with work-related noise-induced hearing loss by a health-care professional (e.g., physician, audiologist, or ear, throat and nose specialist).
  • You have an existing noise-induced hearing loss claim with the WSIB.

If you are an employer, you should contact us if:

  • Your current or former employee has reported a noise-induced hearing loss condition and your workplace falls under Ontario provincial jurisdiction in the WSIA.
  • You receive questions from the WSIB about an existing noise-induced hearing loss claim.

Ministry of Labour role and responsibilities

The Ministry of Labour’s role is to set, communicate and enforce the Noise Regulation (O. Reg. 381/15), which outlines noise protection requirements for all workplaces in Ontario.

If you are an employee, you should contact the Ministry of Labour if:

  • You have concerns with excessive noise levels in your workplace. Consider raising concerns with your employer, health and safety committee, and/or union before contacting the Ministry of Labour.
  • You have health and safety questions about noise exposure limits, protective measures, and/or warning signs in your workplace.

If you are an employer, you should contact the Ministry of Labour if:

For more information, visit the Ministry of Labour’s Health and Safety webpage.

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada role and responsibilities

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada’s role is to set, communicate and enforce regulations that control hazardous noise in workplaces for federally regulated employers, (e.g., airports, railroads). The legislation is outlined in the Canada Labour Code, Part II, (R.S.C. 1985, c. L-2) and Canada Occupational Safety and Health Regulations, (SOR/86-304) Section 7.4(1)(b)).

If you are an employee, you should contact Human Resources and Skills Development Canada if:

  • Your workplace falls under federal jurisdiction, and you have concerns with excessive noise levels in your workplace. Consider raising concerns with your employer, health and safety committee, and/or union before contacting Human Resources and Skills Development Canada.
  • You have health and safety questions about acceptable noise exposure limits and/or want additional information about Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations.

If you are an employer, you should contact Human Resources and Skills Development Canada if:

  • Your workplace falls under federal jurisdiction, and you have concerns with excessive noise levels in your workplace.
  • You have health and safety questions about acceptable noise exposure limits and/or want additional information about Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations.

For more information or to get copies of occupational health and safety hearing loss publications, visit Human Resources and Skills Development Canada’s  Health and Safety webpage.

Health and Safety Associations role and responsibilities

Health and Safety Associations have resources that can help you manage noise in your workplace.

You should contact your Health and Safety Association if:

  • You need additional hearing loss information, including:
    • Understanding the Occupational Health and Safety Act, and regulations in the context of noise
    • General handouts and/or relevant tools (e.g., noise exposure calculator)
    • Training or best practices for hearing conservation programs
    • Assessing and/or implementing noise controls in your workplace
    • Evaluating and/or implementing a hearing loss prevention program
    • Consulting service referrals (e.g., occupational hygienist referral)

Find out more about Health and Safety Associations.

Have questions?

  • For more information, you can call us at 416-344-1000 (TTY: 1-800-387-0050) or 1-800-387-0750 with any questions, Monday to Friday, from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.